Friday, April 21, 2017

@SFWA & #WriteStuff @StoryBundle are Now Available!

The AI bundle is over!

Hopefully you grabbed your bundle.

But not to worry, as StoryBundle always has something amazing to offer.

Ergo, they have two bundles currently available.

The SFWA bundle, which is a collection of 12, yes twelve, great reads from professional science fiction writers, all of whom are esteemed members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. They've been around for more than half a century. And you must be a paid, working writer in order to be eligible for membership.


Grab it now, before it ends Wednesday May 3rd.

Next up is the WriteStuff bundle, a collection of 12 books on writing. Books about writers, by writers, for writers, and for aspiring writers. Because we all know that writing is a trade in which we are all apprentices and no one ever becomes a master. Was it Bradbury who said that???

The Write Stuff bundle is curated by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, author of Goals & Dreams: Freelancer's Survival Guide. The Write Stuff bundle expires Thursday May 11.



Thursday, April 20, 2017

The #ArtificialIntelligence @Storybundle ENDS TODAY April 20 Midnight Eastern, 9 PM Pacific #SFWApro


The Artificial Intelligence Storybundle
Curated by Lisa Mason
Artificial Intelligence—A.I. When computers become conscious. Self-aware. Genuinely as intelligent as human beings. Will A.I. benefit humanity? Or become our greatest enemy?
In the March, 2017 Scientific American, Gary Marcus, a professor of neural science at New York University, joins futurist Ray Kerzweil, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking and others in concluding that the Singularity—that moment when A.I. truly exists—has not yet arrived. Will not arrive until the future.
That hasn’t stopped science fiction writers from tackling difficult questions about A.I., speculating about the future, and asking what if? In the most entertaining way! You must check out these amazing books from authors—bestselling, award-winning, as well as popular indies—in the A.I. Storybundle.
In New York Times Bestselling Walter Jon Williams’ Aristoi, an elite class holds dominion over a glittering interstellar culture with virtual reality, genetic engineering, faster-than-light travel, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, telepathic links with computers, and more. But murder threatens to rip that world apart. In award-winning Linda Nagata’s The Bohr Maker, a powerful, illicit device known as the Bohr Maker, a microscopic factory full of self-replicating machines programmed to transform a human host into a genius-level nanotech engineer. In Nagata’s Limit of Vision, biotechnologists enhance their own cognitive abilities and the experiment goes terribly wrong. In Locus Hardcover Bestsellers Arachne and CyberwebLisa Mason follows telelinker Carly Quester as she confronts an A.I. therapist and finds herself entangled in the machinations of powerful A.I. sengines who want to destroy humanity. In Rewired, editors John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly present stories about A.I. and the future by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan, Jonathan Lethem, and twelve others. In Queen City Jazz, award-winning Kathleen Ann Goonan’s teenage heroine Verity journeys to the technologically superior but dangerously insane “enlivened” city of Cincinnati. In Glass Houses:Avatars Dance, acclaimed Laura J. Mixon takes us to a dystopian Manhattan of the next century where Ruby and her Golem, six hundred pounds of vaguely human-shaped, remote-operated power, run into serious trouble. In Eye Candy, popular indie author Ryan Schneider takes us next to Los Angeles of 2047 where a roboticist famous for his books on the inner workings of artificially-intelligent beings finds himself on a blind date with a beautiful robopsychologist named Candy. Trouble! And award-winning editor Samuel Peralta offers thirteen stories by new bestselling authors addressing the Singularity and A.I. in The A.I. Chronicles Anthology.
As always at Storybundle.com, you the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may designate a portion of the proceeds to go to a charity. For the AI Storybundle, that’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (“SFWA”). SFWA champions writers’ rights, sponsors the Nebula Award for excellence in science fiction, and promotes numerous literacy groups.
The basic bundle (minimum $ 5 to purchase, more if you feel the books are worth more) includes:
  • Aristoi by Walter Jon Williams
  • The Bohr Maker by Linda Nagata
  • Arachne by Lisa Mason
  • Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, edited by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly including stories by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan, Jonathan Lethem, and twelve others
  • Queen City Jazz by Kathleen Ann Goonan
To complete your bundle, beat the bonus price of $15 and you’ll receive another five amazing books:
  • Eye Candy by Ryan Schneider
  • Glass Houses by Laura Mixon
  • Cyberweb by Lisa Mason
  • Limit of Vision by Linda Nagata
  • The A.I. Chronicles Anthology edited by Samuel Peralta including stories by David SimpsonJulie Czerneda, and eleven others
So there you have it! Download your own bundle with award-winning, best-selling, and indie speculations about A.I. and the far future. The Artificial Intelligence Storybundle is both historic and unique, an excellent addition to your elibrary providing world-class reading right now, through the summer, and beyond.
–Lisa Mason, Curator
The A.I. Storybundle is available only from March 29 to April 20, 2017 and only via Storybundle. The bundle is easy to read on computers, smartphones, and tablets, as well as Kindle and other ereaders via file transfer, email, and other methods. You get multiple DRM-free formats (.epub and .mobi) for all books.
When the bundle is gone, it’s gone. Download yours today!
It’s super easy to give the gift of reading with StoryBundle, thanks to our gift cards – which allow you to send someone a code that they can redeem for any future StoryBundle bundle – and timed delivery, which allows you to control exactly when your recipient will get the gift of StoryBundle.
Why StoryBundle? Here are just a few benefits StoryBundle provides.
  • Get quality reads: We’ve chosen works from excellent authors to bundle together in one convenient package.
  • Pay what you want (minimum $ 5): You decide how much these fantastic books are worth to you. If you can only spare a little, that’s fine! You’ll still get access to a batch of thrilling titles.
  • Support authors who support DRM-free books: StoryBundle is a platform for authors to get exposure for their works, both for the titles featured in the bundle and for the rest of their list. Supporting authors who let you read their books on any device you want—restriction free—will show everyone there’s nothing wrong with ditching DRM.
  • Give to worthy causes: Bundle buyers have a chance to donate a portion of their proceeds to charity. The A.I. Storybundle forwards your donations to Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.
  • Receive bonus books to complete your bundle. When you beat our bonus price of $ 15, you’re not just getting five books, you’re getting ten!
The A.I. Storybundle ENDS TODAY Thursday, April 20, 2017 midnight Eastern, 9 P.M. Pacific! Pay what you want for the core bundle, unlock the bonus books, donate to charity. Explore Artificial Intelligence and how A.I. will affect the future in Aristoi by Walter Jon Williams, The Bohr Maker by Linda Nagata, Arachne by Lisa Mason, Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, edited by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly with stories by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan, Jonathan Lethem, and others, Queen City Jazz by Kathleen Ann Goonan, Eye Candy by Ryan Schneider, Glass Houses by Laura J. Mixon, Cyberweb by Lisa Mason, Limit of Vision by Linda Nagata, and The A.I. Chronicles Anthology, edited by Samuel Peralta. Download yours TODAY at https://storybundle.com/aiWhen it’s gone, it’s gone….

10 Questions with Hugo Award Winner Laura J. Mixon (@LauraJMG)






This Author Spotlight
features

LAURA J. MIXON

author of

Glass Houses



SF novelist and Hugo-winning blogger Laura J. Mixon wrote her first story for her own amusement at age eight. At age 11, she discovered science fiction in the local library and never looked back. Her popular SF thriller Up Against It came out from Tor Books (as M. J. Locke) in 2011 and is due for re-release soon as part of an upcoming trilogy. Set among the asteroids, it is the first book of WAVE, a series of novels
about savvy and desperate people (and other beings) living in a future, settled solar system.

Author of six novels and assorted shorter works, including the highly acclaimed cyberpunk trilogy AVATARS DANCE (Glass Houses, Proxies, and Burning the Ice).

She and fellow SF writer Steven Gould stabbed the cake/tied the knot at WeddingCon in early 1989. They have collaborated on one novel and two world-class daughters, now grown (who might even be spotted wandering the halls of certain cons and costuming events). They now live in New Mexico with their daughters.

She is an environmental engineer and served two years in Kenya in the Peace Corps. Her work is often associated with the cyberpunk movement, and has been the focus of academic studies on the intersection of technology, feminism, and gender. She is a graduate of the Clarion writing workshop and an instructor at the Viable Paradise genre writing workshop on Martha's Vineyard. She blogs occasionally at laurajmixon.com and feralsapient.com and tweets as @LauraJMG.

1.How did you get into writing and why do you write?

I grew up in the late sixties and early seventies in a neighborhood with a lot of kids, and my favorite game was Pretend. We were a roving pack of AR players, back when AR was all in your head. We riffed off of Star Trek, Land of the Giants, Lost in Space, and the Avengers (the British spies version with Diana Rigg, ohmigod) and The Man /Girl from U.N.C.L.E,  those creepy Saturday matinees like The Twilight Zone and The Man with Xray Vision. We had the best adventures.

The one thing that really bugged me, though, was that I had no control over the plot. The other kids all had their own ideas about what was supposed to happen, and when I’d say, for instance, “Bang! You’re dead,” they’d jump back up and say, “No, I’m not!”  So I started writing my stories down.

Little did I know what I was letting myself in for; my own characters have even LESS desire to behave. Hah!

2.What do you like best (or least) about writing?

I think it’s the same thing that drew me to Pretend when I was a kid. That desire to be transported into another world. To be surprised by the unexpected things that happen to my characters, and how they respond. That sense of wonder and delight you get when everything seems chaotic and out of control, and suddenly it all clicks into place and you see that deeper pattern.

3.What is your writing process? IE do you outline? Do you stick to a daily word or page count, write 7 days a week, etc?

For the world building, I tend to put a lot of work into research and design. For the characters and plot, I’m a mostly-pantser. I have a few high points I know I want to hit, but the main pleasure I get from writing comes from being surprised by what I discover as I write.

4.Who are some other writers you read and admire, regardless of whether they are commercially “successful?”

Oh, my God, there are so many great writers out there!

The other writers in this bundle are all pretty awesome. My husband Steve and I have always been fans of Lisa Mason, Linda Nagata, and Walter Jon Williams, and now I’ve bought the AI Storybundle and am eager to read yours and Kathleen Ann Goonan’s as well.

I also had the pleasure of being on the Philip K. Dick jury a couple of years ago, and discovered several writers I loved. I could go on and on about all six of the books on the nominees list. We had a hard time narrowing the list down to six. Here’s the list. You’re in for a treat!

You have to check out the winner, Meg Elison’s The Book of the Unnamed Midwife. And the special citation winner, Jennifer Marie Brissett’s Elysium, blew my freakin mind. So much creativity in the worldbuilding, characters I loved, and masterful control over her prose. Highly recommended.

I also love Cory Doctorow’s stuff. His Little Brother series is magnificent. For the Win made me cry my eyes out.

Martha Wells’s Raksura series is sooooo goooood. Anything by Nalo Hopkinson.

Marko Kloos’s Frontlines series, and Curtis Chen’s Waypoint Kangaroo.  Charlie Jane Anders’s All the Birds in the Sky.

And Andrea Hairston’s fantasies! She has a new one out, Wild Do Magic for Small Change. Wonderful.


5.Should the question mark in the above question be inside or outside the quotes?

Outside, dammit! sayeth the engineer. The writer in me shrugs; whatever—I’m in it for the fun and glory and adventure. Just be consistent with that punctuation stuff and use it to tell a great story, and I’m yours.

6.What’s your stance on the Oxford Comma?

Pro. I’ll fight you.

7.What is your book Glass Houses about and how did it come to fruition?

It was an out-take—a sort of side story—that emerged while I was writing Proxies, my novel in the same series. Ruby Kubick, a lesbian waldo operator who used her robotic drones to avoid going outside or interacting with anyone in person, sprang to life in my head, and she just wouldn’t go away. But her story didn’t fit inside the other work, which was already too big. So I gave her her own story.

Ruby is a young woman in a future, drowned New York City, about a century or so from now. She has direct brain interface tech, which she uses to control a set of junkyard robots, and uses them to scrape out a living doing salvage. On one operation during a storm, she discovers a wealthy man who got stranded in a decrepit high-rise. She attempts to rescue him, and things go badly awry from there…

It’s a noir-ish mystery-adventure, and also a story about Ruby, who has fallen for a woman who doesn’t love her back, working on how to take control of her own fate, and get out of this trap she’s in, this sticky web of life circumstances and choices she’s made whose consequences she couldn’t have predicted.


8.What’s your current writing project?

Thanks for asking! :D I have a few nifty projects I’m having fun with.

My publisher and I want to do at least two more books in my Wave series, along with a re-release of the first book, Up Against It. The series is about a middle-future, partially-settled solar system, with rogue AI and humans of various sorts trying to survive. UAI starts with a disaster that puts the asteroid colony at risk, and turns into a political thriller. It’s sometimes compared to James S.A. Corey’s The Expanse, as their book and mine came out about the same time and feature asteroids and rogue tech and races against time… nyeh heh heh…

I’m also nearly done with a near-future SF novel about the space race to Mars, and a young woman who gets caught up in the events. It’s called Child Left Behind.

I read an early draft of the first few scenes back in 2013 at SF in SF (SF in SF, if you haven’t heard of it, is a sort of happy-hour—interviews and readings—style event hosted by Terry Bisson and organized by Rina Weisman and Rick Kleffel. It is a BLAST, and if you’re ever in the Bay area, definitely go).

Here’s Rick’s write-up about our event (my entry’s the second one down), and if you want a taste of my work in progress (nearly done now!), you can hear me read an early version of the first chapter here.

I’ve also been working on a cool project in George R.R. Martin’s Wild Cards universe, but am sworn to secrecy there, for now… I’ll let you know when and if I can reveal the details!


9.What book(s) are you currently reading?

One of the great perqs of being a writer is knowing other writers—which means having access to works hot off the writer’s keyboard! I’ve managed to snare an advance reading copy of Annalee Newitz’s Autonomous, which I’ve just started.

Up next is Nalo Hopkinson’s The Blackheart Man. I’d gotten to read snippets of it while she was working on it, so I’m very excited to read the finished work!


10.Who or what inspires your writing?

The people who came before. Ursula K. LeGuin and Samuel R. Delany and Robert A Heinlein and Clifford D. Simak and C.L. Moore. Bradbury and Asimov and Williamson and Butler. Tanith Lee and Mary Shelley and H. G. Wells and so many others. Their stories helped me know how much bigger and weirder and full of wonders the world was than I could ever have imagined, at a time when I desperately needed to know that.

The people coming up now. Newer writers, young and old, emerging into the spotlight of readers’ attention—people of so many cultural backgrounds and identities that have been under-represented in the past, beginning to achieve recognition after being kept in the shadows for far too long. Telling new stories. Showing us thrilling new ways to tell the old ones.

The people who will come after.

I believe the literature of the fantastic is not just unbelievably cool and fun to read; it also plays a crucial role in helping guide us in our efforts to curate a multi-cultural, sustainable future. An ecologically healthy planet, a future welcoming and plentiful, with room for all our hopes and dreams.

So yeah. All that mushy “boldly-go-holding-hands” stuff.

Finally, is there anything you’d care to add? Please also include where people can read your published stories, buy your book, etc.

Nope, all good! You can get copies of my Avatars Dance series, as well as Up Against It, which I wrote as M. J. Locke, as e-books on Amazon or iTunes or Barnes and Noble. I have a novelette about climate change, “True North,” in Welcome to the Greenhouse, as M. J. Locke, and I’m on Twitter, mostly ranting about fascists these days (mixed in with the occasional cool science gif, photo, or link and book squee), as @LauraJMG. Stop by and say hey.

Thank you, Laura, for all the info, links, and insight! Please visit again when UAI, Child Left Behind,  and the GRRM top-secret project is/are ready! We'd love to learn more.

Be sure to see Laura's Glass Houses in the Artificial Intelligence StoryBundle if it's still available. Otherwise, visit her online and anywhere books are sold!


Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Check Out These Amazing Stories in The A.I. Chronicles edited by Samuel Peralta The Artificial Intelligence Storybundle! #SFWApro #artificialintelligence


The A.I. Chronicles (Future Chronicles Book 2) edited by Samuel PeraltaSynopses of Stories in the Anthology
The Syntax of Consciousness by Pavarti K. Tyler
With one small implanted device, you will experience complete sensory integration with all the information available on the global net. Say goodbye to VI Fees and holo-displays. It is now all available in the blink of an eye. Enter the next lottery wave to receive your free InGen Corp Jiminy Implant. “Jiminy: The little voice in the back of your head.”
Piece of Cake by Patrice Fitzgerald
Rule by A.I. is a fact of life for those under the thumb of the Federal United. There will be a certain amount of exercise every day. Citizens will be on time. Appropriate mates will be identified from amongst candidates with suitable genetic traits… and a proper weight will be maintained. But sometimes you’ve just got to go off the reservation.
Restore by Susan Kaye Quinn
What if Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics were replaced by a single emotion—unconditional love? Restorative Human Medical Care Unit 7435, sentience level fifty, wants to heal the human master it loves, but Unit 7435 finds there is a price to be paid for love… and for failing in its primary mission.
Narai by E.E. Giorgi
When artificial intelligence takes over the family practice where he works, Dr. Peter Sawyer struggles to accept his new role as a mere supervisor instead of a clinician. With the aid of psychotherapy, he slowly adjusts to his new routine, until the sudden death of an anorexic patient makes him question everything, even his own life.
Left Foot on a Blind Man by Julie E. Czerneda
Replacing failing body parts with non-biological equivalents isn’t new. Wooden legs and teeth have been found in corpses thousands of years old. What is? How smart they are. “Left Foot on a Blind Man” is a cautionary tale about making such replacements too smart for our own good.
Sub-Human: Nash’s Equilibrium by David Simpson
Craig Emilson, a young doctor, is sucked into military service at the outbreak of World War III. Enlisting to become a Special Forces suborbital paratrooper, Craig is selected to take part in the most important mission in American military history—a sortie into enemy territory to eliminate the world’s first strong Artificial Intelligence.
Auto by Angela Cavanaugh
Auto was the most advanced A.I. ever created.  But when he learned about his backups, he began to wonder what exactly the self in self-aware might mean.  When he fears for his existence, he escapes into the internet.  And an intelligence built to learn, combined with a nearly endless amount of information, is a dangerous combination.
Eve’s Awakening by Logan Thomas Snyder
An overworked, under-appreciated technician seizes the opportunity presented by an FBI raid on his company to steal corporate property. What he discovers is like nothing he could have imagined—an artificial intelligence that may not even be the first of its kind in existence. Meanwhile, the A.I. known as Eve is concerned only with finding her “parents,” a quest that will alter the lives of everyone who comes into contact with her—for better or for worse.
Maker by Sam Best
Decades after the birth and abandonment of artificial intelligence, a reclusive inventor comes face to face with an evolved form of his creation. The world as he knew it is changed as a direct result of his tinkering. Yet with the arrival of his creation, the inventor learns there is hope to correct his past mistakes, if he is brave enough to try…
Vendetta by Chrystalla Thoma
Plagued by dreams of the distant sea, Imogen wakes up one morning to find a Controller asking questions—questions about the dreams she’s not supposed to have. Curious to know more, she eavesdrops on their conversation, and what she hears isn’t reassuring. It appears that her memory has been tampered with, that she has tech implanted in her body—that is, more tech than the average human—and even worse, she’s not even her parents’ daughter. The implanted tech, however, might be her most immediate problem. Under the Tech Directive, exceeding a certain percentage of tech in one’s body can mean on-the-spot termination. The only person Imogen can trust to share this information with is her friend, Edil. But Edil, with his scar and unexplained head injury, may be hiding secrets of his own—secrets not so different from the ones about to transform Imogen’s life.
The Turing Cube by Alex Albrinck
Our lives are turning into a series of 0’s and 1’s, masses of data available to those with the technological know-how to access, assess, and exploit it. And while corporations and governments work to protect sensitive information, no digital information is ever truly safe. Jack Milton lost more than money to just such an exploit; he lost his pride. He’s decided to take matters into his own hands, root out the perpetrators, and bring them to justice, regardless of the personal and professional risks. But he may find that something more valuable than money can be lost.
Darkly Cries the Digital by A.K. Meek
In the Deep South, modern-day technology blends with eternal superstition for a family that suffers a tragic loss; the death of their ten-year old son. And now, driven by grief, unable to accept the whirlwind circumstance outside of his control, a business executive makes a fateful decision that severs what remains of his already-broken family.
The End by Peter Cawdron
With the death of his grandmother, Professor Joe Browne has had to face his own mortality. Joe doesn’t want to admit there’s an end coming, and yet he knows that just as he turns the final page in a book, one day death will bring his life to a close, or will it? Could life be uploaded into a computer? To answer that question, Professor Browne needs to first understand if a computer could ever develop an artificial intelligence of its own.
Created by award-winning author Samuel Peralta, and edited by some of the most-respected editors in the genre, The Future Chronicles is the #1 bestselling anthology series that brings together work from visionary new voices and from the grandmasters of modern speculative fiction. Visit Sam Peralta at http://www.samuelperalta.com
The A.I. Storybundle is live, but only TWO MORE DAYS until April 20, 2017! Explore Artificial Intelligence and how A.I. will affect the future in Aristoi by Walter Jon WilliamsThe Bohr Maker by Linda NagataArachne by Lisa MasonRewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, edited by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly with stories by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan, and others, Queen City Jazz by Kathleen Ann GoonanEye Candy by Ryan SchneiderGlass Houses by Laura J. MixonCyberweb by Lisa MasonLimit of Vision by Linda Nagata, and The A.I. Chronicles Anthology, edited by Samuel Peralta. Download yours today athttps://storybundle.com/ai.  When it’s gone, it’s gone!

The A.I. Chronicles edited by Samuel Peralta is in the Artificial Intelligence Storybundle! Lisa Mason #SFWApro #artificialintelligence


The A.I. Chronicles (Future Chronicles Book 2) edited by Samuel Peralta
A.I.: Artificial Intelligence. Even today, machines that mimic human thinking surround us. As the intellectual feats of computing machines grow more and more astounding, will there be a day when their apparent intelligence approaches, or even surpasses, that of human beings? And what if these machines then become conscious, self-aware?
In this latest title in the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ series of speculative fiction anthologies, thirteen authors confront the question of the Singularity: at and beyond that point of time when A.I. becomes more than simply a human construct. From first awareness to omniscience, these original short stories explore that territory where human intelligence comes face-to-face with what is either its greatest hope, or its greatest threat.
The A.I. Chronicles features stories by bestselling author David Simpson (the Post-Human series), Prix Aurora winner Julie Czerneda (In the Company of Others), plus eleven more of today’s top authors in speculative and science fiction.
“The best place to discover new SF authors, I think, is any of the anthologies coming from Samuel Peralta”
Hugh Howey, NY Times bestselling author of Wool
“A powerful new voice in speculative fiction”
— Nick Webb, USA Today bestselling author of the Legacy Fleet trilogy
Samuel Peralta
Creator and Series Editor of The Future Chronicles
Samuel Peralta is a physicist, storyteller, and an accidental anthologist. He is the creator and series editor of the acclaimed Future Chronicles series of speculative fiction anthologies, featuring over a score of internationally bestselling titles. His writing has been spotlighted in Best American Poetry, selected for Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy, and has won multiple awards.
In addition to his publishing projects, Samuel currently serves on the board of directors of several technology firms, having co-founded successful start-ups in software and semiconductors. He’s also supported and produced over a hundred independent films, one of which earned an official Golden Globe nomination.
For more on his work and other titles in The Future Chronicles series, visit www.samuelperalta.com
The A.I. Storybundle is live, but only three more days until Thursday, April 20, 2017! Explore Artificial Intelligence and how A.I. will affect the future in Aristoi by Walter Jon WilliamsThe Bohr Maker by Linda NagataArachne by Lisa MasonRewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, edited by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly with stories by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan, and others, Queen City Jazz by Kathleen Ann GoonanEye Candy by Ryan SchneiderGlass Houses by Laura MixonCyberweb by Lisa MasonLimit of Vision by Linda Nagata, and The A.I. Chronicles Anthology, edited by Samuel Peralta. Download yours only athttps://storybundle.com/ai. When it’s gone, it’s gone!