Thursday, October 1, 2015

Who was Philip K Dick? The Philip K Dick Award Storybundle



Who was Philip K Dick?

The Philip K Dick Award Storybundle





Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928– March 2, 1982) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and philosopher whose published works mainly belong to the genre of science fiction. Dick explored philosophical, sociological, political, and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states of consciousness.

In his later works, Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his own life experiences in addressing the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in novels such as A Scanner Darkly and VALIS.

Perhaps his best-known work is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which served as the source material for the iconic film BLADERUNNER.


Ridley Scott has announced that he is producing a sequel to BLADERUNNER. Harrison Ford has signed on as well. Should be interesting.

Later in life, PKD wrote non-fiction on philosophy, theology, the nature of reality and science. This material was published posthumously as The Exegesis.



The novel The Man in the High Castle bridged the genres of alternate history and science fiction, earning Dick a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1963.



Amazon Studios made a pilot TV show out of it. The pilot debuted on January 15, 2015[1] and was Amazon's "most-watched since the original series development program began." On February 18, 2015, it was announced that it has been picked up for a season of 10 episodes to be released November 20, 2015.

If you haven't seen it yet (or read the novel), do so pronto. I enjoyed both. The book was good; the TV show was perhaps even better because seeing the visual elements of the story brought to life made the story absolutely terrifying. It disturbed me. Watch the trailer. See for yourself.



Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, a novel about a celebrity who awakens in a parallel universe where he is unknown, won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel in 1975. 

"I want to write about people I love, and put them into a fictional world spun out of my own mind, not the world we actually have, because the world we actually have does not meet my standards," Dick wrote of these stories. "In my writing I even question the universe; I wonder out loud if it is real, and I wonder out loud if all of us are real."

In addition to forty-four novels published as mass market paperbacks, Dick wrote approximately one hundred twenty-one short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime.

So there you have it, my friends. The Philip K Dick Award Storybundle includes Aestival Tide by Elizabeth Hand (PKD Finalist), Life by Gwyneth Jones (PKD Winner), The Cipher by Kathe Koja (PKD Finalist), Points of Departure by Pat Murphy (PKD Winner), Dark Seeker by K. W. Jeter (PKD Finalist), Summer of Love by Lisa Mason (PKD Finalist), Frontera by Lewis Shiner (PKD Finalist), Acts of Conscience by William Barton (PKD Special Citation), Maximum Ice by Kay Kenyon (PKD Finalist), Knight Moves by Walter Jon Williams (PKD Finalist), and Reclamation by Sarah Zettel (PKD Finalist).


The Philip K Dick Award Storybundle runs only until October 15. Once it’s gone, it’s gone. Download yours today at http://storybundle.com/pkdaward and enjoy world-class, award-winning reading right now and into the holidays.

And for more kick-ass sci-fi, check out my novel EYE CANDY. It's a sweet, romantic, daring adventure with an ensemble of characters PKD would've loved, and you'll love it too. 

And follow me on Instagram for daily writing inspiration and sneak peeks of my work.

No comments:

Post a Comment